Life in the Time of Covid

We put our social calendars on hold this month and plunged into an open-ended period of physical distancing. Here are some of the amusements we used to replace shopping and hanging with friends. – March, 2020

 

FROG VIEWING

 

A bevy of green-lipped frogs are a lot easier to see now that we’ve reconstructed our pollinator pond garden. We are replacing the Nandina and Buddleia with Milkweed and Butterfly Weed to go with the existing native grasses, black-eyed Susan, phlox, red cannas, and Autumn Joy sedum.

 

SEE AND BE SEEN

 

These ordinarily reclusive frogs climbed atop high perches during a mid-March breeding frenzy.

 

GARAGE CLEANING

 

We dusted pollen from Amy’s trunk and found a cryptic note inside. If you have an idea what the purpose of this trunk may have been, please let us know.

 

ANALOGUE SUNDAY

 

No-browser Sundays have forced Camille to explore her watercolor pencils and catch up on her reading.

 

WOODSY WANDERS

 

Individually or as a pair, we routinely disappear into Tami and Lyle’s woods. What joy to have this beautiful resource outside our back door!

 

SKY GAZING

 

This one’s for Jason – a sycamore with four towering trunks that he brought to our attention years ago.

 

HONORING FORMIDABLE SPECIMENS

 

Bob stands beside another formidable sycamore, and we gaze up the trunk of our favorite beech.

 

CARL

 

Carl provides us a place of repose and the comforting reminder that our lives represent an insignificant blip on the time continuum.

 

WILDLIFE SIGHTINGS

See the leaves? See the snake?

 

COPPER HEAD

 

Following the sound of a small waterfall coming from a three-tributary creek confluence, we went off-trail and nearly stepped on a large Copperhead.

 

HOME ECONOMICS

Making Pee Squares, a reusable toilet paper substitute, from flannel Taxi towels we purchased in Kumasi.

 

HOARDING

 

Camille invested nearly $400 into lock-down supplies and has not been inside a grocery store since March 11. Two weeks later, we’d hardly made a dent in our supplies. Most of the food shown was in stock before the big shop. Not shown: 10 pounds each of dried beans, flour, and wheat gluten; a bucket of extruded soy protein, 4 pounds of pasta, 2 pounds of rice, ingredients to make two batches of chex mix, several dozen eggs, and the contents of the other freezer. Is this good planning or evidence of childhood food insecurity? We welcome your thoughts.

 

UNSOLVED MYSTERIES

 

Are these native columbines? What are these sticky-outy things on the trunk of one of our young chestnuts? Give us your best guess. We’re dying to know.

 

BIRD WATCHING

Bob installed this Bluebird box last fall and the first tenants have produced a clutch of four blue eggs.

 

ARCHAEOLOGY

 

Camille unearthed a dirt-encrusted toy when planting columbines and a woman in a red dress revealed herself after a good washing.  This turned out to be a replica of the Memphis Belle, a Boeing B-17F which was active during the Second World War. Not ordinarily a man-made war object fan, Camille likes her new toy because it reminds her of her Uncle Frank and his model plane hobby.

 

THE ORIGINAL BELLE

This is a photo of the Memphis Belle in flight. The plane is on display in Dayton, Ohio.

____________________________________________________________

[Troutsfarm] * [March, 2020] * [Life in the Time of Covid]

____________________________________________________________